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Suhru Wines
 
June 15, 2021 | Suhru Wines

How White Wine is Made

Sauvignon Blanc GrapesIf you have spent much time on the North Fork of Long Island or in any wine country in the Fall you likely know that September and October are harvest season. Typically starting the second week of September on the North Fork the white wine grapes begin reaching optimal ripeness and harvest season begins! 

When the grapes have reached optimal ripeness they are harvested either by machine or by hand depending on the winemaker's preference and brought into the winery. Once they arrive at the winery, the grapes are destemmed and then loaded into the press where all of that delicious grape juice is gently extracted from the grape skins.

Fun Fact: The sugar content in a grape is measured using a system of measurement called "Brix" the higher the brix number, the more sugar in a grape. 

Once the grapes have been pressed, the grape juice is pumped into a tank where it is chilled and settled. The settled juice is then racked off any remaining grape pulp and brought back up to temperature to prepare to start the fermentation process. At this point the juice is inoculated with yeast and fermentation begins.

During fermentation the yeast cells consume the naturally occurring sugars in the grape juice. As the yeast consumes the sugar it produces alcohol and releases carbon dioxide (CO2). The CO2 as it is released creates a protective barrier at the top of the tank, preventing oxygen from coming in contact with the wine. Once all of the sugars have been consumed and converted into alcohol the yeast cells die and precipitate out of the liquid, settling to the bottom of the tank. Once everything has settled, the clear wine is racked (aka transferred) off the solids (aka dead yeast cells) into a new tank where it undergoes the final finishing touches (heat stabilization, cold stabilization, filtering, etc) before it is bottled, chilled and served! 

Learn More About Our White Wines

Suhru Wines White WinesAt Suhru we make a number of crisp, bright, dry white wines with each grape variety specifically selected to offer a wonderful compliment to our local cuisine. If you are looking for a big, bold white wine with lots of acidity look no further than our Pinot Grigio! Made in the Italian style, this dry white wine is crisp and refreshing making it an excellent compliment to our local seafood and a perfect wine for sitting by the pool, zipping around the bay, or lounging on the beach!

For a wine with softer flavors leaning into the minerality of the grape our Sauvignon Blanc is an excellent choice! While also an excellent accompaniment to our local seafood and all of the wonderful outdoor activities available to us here on the North Fork, one of our favorite pairings for this wine is a glass of Sauvignon Blanc and fresh local oysters! The brininess of the oysters offers the perfect balance to the soft, subtle fruit flavors and light minerality present in the glass.

Last but certainly not least is our Dry Riesling! Made using fruit grown in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York, this fruity white wine offers a dynamic wide range of flavors. Dry Riesling is commonly referred to in the wine world as one of the most versatile food pairing wines because while it has all of the brightness and crispness of a dry white wine it also has a small amount of residual sugar that softens that bright acidity allowing it to compliment a much wider range of foods than your typical white wine. The classic pairing suggestions for Riesling are Asian dishes such as sushi and curries and while both of those are delicious we tend to gravitate towards blackened fish tacos and dry rub BBQ with this wine. It's a great wine to play around with as you'll see as you taste it, every sip holds something slightly different. Happy sipping! 

Shop Suhru's White Wines!

Shelby Hearn
 
June 8, 2021 | Shelby Hearn

Cooking with Suhru: Lemon Garlic Shrimp & Pinot Grigio

Lemon Garlic Shrimp and Suhru Pinot GrigioOne of the many wonderful things about the North Fork is our abundance of seafood! The East Ends proximity to the bays and ocean make it home to some wonderful fisherman and when you have freshly caught seafood there isn't a lot you need to dress it up!

All that being said, one of our favorite summer go-tos is Lemon Garlic Grilled Shrimp served on Grilled Sourdough. This dish is all about the shrimp and focuses on the rich, bright flavors! Quick and easy, the whole meal can be made on the grill in just minutes—which makes it the perfect summer meal for those days when you want every excuse to spend another minute outside.

Whether you are having friends over for dinner or just looking for a simple and quick meal to prepare at home, this dish is sure to please and is a great excuse to fire up the grill. Pair it with a bottle of Suhru Pinot Grigio and dinner is served!

I prefer to cook this dish in a cast iron skillet on the grill, but it can also be prepared on your stove top.The below recipe is adapted from the Lemon Garlic Butter Shrimp recipe from Cafe Delights with a few small tweaks. We hope you enjoy!


Lemon Garlic Shrimp on Grilled Sourdough

Suhru Pinot Grigio and Lemon Garlic ShrimpIngredients:

  • 4 TBSP butter, divided
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 lemons
  • Sourdough baguette, sliced
  • Fresh chopped parsley, to garnish
  • 1 bottle Suhru Pinot Grigio

Serves 2

Directions:

  1. While your BBQ is pre-heating, chop your garlic, slice one lemon in half, cut butter into two 2 TBSP pieces, and cut sourdough baguette into 1 1/2 inch thick slices.
  2. Melt 2 tablespoon butter in a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat on the BBQ. While the butter is melting, place sourdough slices directly on the grill to toast.
  3. Once the butter has melted, add the garlic and cook until fragrant (about 1 minute). 
  4. Add shrimp and squeeze the juice of half a lemon over shrimp and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook 2 minutes on one side, stirring occasionally.
  5. Flip sourdough slices so grill marks appear on both sides.
  6. Flip the shrimp in the pan and cook 2 minutes on the other side until JUST beginning to turn pink.
  7. Add in the remaining butter and lemon juice. Cook, while stirring, until the butter melts and the shrimp have cooked through (do not over cook them).
  8. Remove from the heat. Taste test, and add more lemon juice, salt or pepper, if needed.
  9. Chop parsley and slice second lemon into wedges.
  10. Place grilled sourdough slices on plates and top with shrimp. Sprinkle with freshly chopped parsley and serve with a lemon wedge and a glass of Pinot Grigio. Cheers!
Discover more Cooking with Suhru recipes and Food & Wine Pairings! 
Suhru Wines
 
June 1, 2021 | Suhru Wines

June 2021 Wine of the Month: Pinot Grigio

Suhru Wines June 2021 Wine of the Month: Pinot Grigio

At Suhru we have always focused on making Pinot Grigio in the classic Italian style which characteristically is known for big, bold, fruit notes with a bright, crisp acidity.

When we first opened Suhru Wines and were deciding which grape varieties we wanted to work with Pinot Grigio was the first one we selected. In our cool maritime climate we grow crisp, bright, fruit expressive whites so well that making a Pinot Grigio in the Italian style seemed like the obvious choice, although no-one was doing it.

Pinot Grigio was the first wine we made under the Suhru label and now over 10 years later it still remains one of our most popular wines! 

What's the Difference Between Pinot Grigio & Pinot Gris?

Domestically here in the US Pinot Grigio and Pinot Gris have become synonymous, however they describe two different styles of winemaking for the same grape, Italian vs French. 

Pinot Grigio when made in the Italian style is all about lightness and fruit forward flavors culminating in crisp acidity, a perfect compliment to our Maritime cuisine. Pinot Gris made in the Alsatian style however are characteristically made using riper fruit, which results in lower acidity with enhanced viscosity on the mouthfeel and is typically finished with some residual sugar remaining in the wine. This style although enjoyable, is stylized behind a totally different cuisine than what we see in our region.

If you're interested in learning more about the differences between the two styles, checkout our History of a Grape: Pinot Grigio vs Pinot Gris blog post where we take a deep dive of these two styles!

Pinot Grigio GrapesA Closer Look at the Vineyard

Of all of the vineyards we work with, the Pinot Grigio vineyard sees the most consistency from year to year. Located slightly further west than the rest of our vineyard partners, this particular parcel of land is extremely flat and uniform across the entire block which allows for uniformity in ripening leading it to be one of the first vineyards to ripen each year.

In the 2020 growing season we saw nice growth on the vine with warm days and lots of sunshine however as we entered the harvest season we experienced cooler than normal temperatures with very cool evenings. This delayed ripening which allowed the berries to retain the acidity in the grapes much longer, allowing for riper flavors to develop at lower sugar ripening stages.

As a result our 2020 Pinot Grigio has rich fruit flavors and more complexity and depth than years past while still maintaining that crisp acidity that makes this wine so wonderfully refreshing! 

Fun Fact: Pinot Grigio grapes ripen to have red rather than green skins and give off an orange tinge to the grape juice when it is pressed that dissipates as it undergoes fermentation.

Want to Learn more about this wine? Checkout our 2020 Pinot Grigio!

Shelby Hearn
 
May 26, 2021 | Shelby Hearn

Cooking With Suhru: Seared Sea Scallops & Pinot Grigio

One of our favorite things about summer is the plethora of delicious food and drink options available to refresh you after a long day in the sun! Sometimes simple is best and with seafood that is often the case, you can't go wrong with a perfectly seared sea scallop!

The summer months on the North Fork scream for seafood and seared scallops with a bottle of crisp, dry Pinot Grigio are one of our all time family favorites!

As a wonderfully wise chef once told me—the key to a perfectly seared scallop is an extremely hot pan! Drop those babies in for a few minutes on each side letting them get a nice crisp on the exterior without over cooking in the center and enjoy with a side of Sang Lee Farms bok choy for a quick & easy but most importantly tasty summer meal!


Seared Sea Scallop Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp avocado oil (or other high smoke point oil)
  • 1/2 lb sea scallops (patted dry)
  • salt (to taste)
  • pepper (to taste)
  • 2 tbsp butter

Cooking Instructions:

  1. Preheat a cast iron skillet with oil in the pan over medium high heat.
  2. While the pat is heating up, pat the scallops dry with a paper towel, being sure to remove any excess moisture. Once the scallops are dry, season them by sprinkling a small amount of salt and pepper on either side of the scallops.
  3. When the pan is hot (test by sprinkling a small amount of water into the pan, if the water crackles when it hits the oil the pan is hot enough) place your scallops into the pan, giving them ample space so they do not touch. 
  4. Cook scallops for 2 minutes on medium-high heat.
  5. Using tongs, flip each scallop over and add butter to the pan. Let the scallops cook for 1 more minute in the butter before removing them from the heat. A nice golden brown crust should be present on each side.
  6. Serve & enjoy! 

Recommended pairing: grilled Sourdough toast, sesame oil sauteed Sang Lee bok choy, and a chilled bottle of Suhru Pinot Grigio!

Discover more Cooking with Suhru recipes and Food & Wine Pairings! 
Suhru Wines
 
May 19, 2021 | Suhru Wines

Blending Trials: How Blends Are Made

Suhru Wines Blending Trails

From the outside looking in, winemaking is a glamorous profession filled with days spent drinking wine, nibbling cheese, and wandering the vineyards. And while we do do all of that sometimes, the majority of a winemaker's time is spent doing the hard work. As our winemaker Russell is so fond of saying, "Winemaking is 70% sanitation, 20% perspiration (doing the sanitation), 9% inspiration, and 1% degustation but only at the end of the day!" However the exception to that is blending season!

At Suhru, one of our favorite activities (and not just because we get to sit and taste) are blending trials, which are the fascinating and often painstaking process of selecting the best expression of a wine in that particular vintage. 

When you are making a blend, be it red or white, you have two main courses of action. You can either make a field blend or a traditional blend. Field blends are made up of two or more types of grapes planted alongside each other in the vineyard, brought in together at harvest, and co-fermented in the winery. The other method— which we employ at Suhru—is to make a traditional blend, harvesting, fermenting, and barrel aging each of the varietals individually allowing each to develop independently before bringing the flavors together. 

Each Spring—typically in April and May—we blend our reds. The main blend that tends to take the majority of our focus is Ember, our Bordeaux style red blend. Once our winemaker has deemed the individual varietals ready, he puts together a series of blends for us as a group to blind taste. After collecting barrel samples of each of the wines—Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, and Petit Verdot—he pours them into labeled beakers and assesses them each individually for their strengths and weaknesses. It is these strengths and weaknesses that determine how the wines will be blended together. For example, if we had an early winter then the later ripening reds (think Petit Verdot) may not have developed as fully so may not have as much tannic structure in which case we will lean more heavily on the early ripening varietals (think Merlot and Malbec), and barrel influence.

Once the wines have been assessed individually, Russell measures out samples of each variety into a graduated cylinder using a pipette. By doing this he is meticulously selecting the amount of each varietal as he blends them together into a series of different blends (typically 4-5) that best showcase the different directions we can take the wine. Of these 4-5 blends he typically makes one that he feels is the best overall expression, one that mimics as closely as possible the previous vintage and then 2-3 that fall in between those two starting points.

After all that work (by Russell) comes the fun part! We all get together and taste the blends blind so that none of us  knows which wines are which. As we taste we discuss each blend, pointing out the strengths and weaknesses, what we like and dislike, providing feedback that Russell will take back to the winery with him to fine tune the blends. This is our opportunity to give any and all feedback and leave our thumbprint on the wines. We repeat this blending and tasting process as many times as necessary until we find the one that we all love and best represents the vintage, our style, and the individual varieties in the wine!

While of course important work, this is one of our favorite decisions to make and is a great way for us as a winemaking family to come together to share ideas, opinions, and shape the next vintage of Suhru Wines! 

 

Learn More About Ember, our Bordeaux Blend

Shelby Hearn
 
May 12, 2021 | Shelby Hearn

Cooking with Suhru: Baked Brie with Rhubarb Jam & Merlot

Rhubarb Jam Baked Brie with MerlotWith Spring upon us and the first of the seasonal produce beginning to hit the farm stands it seemed only right to showcase rhubarb in this week's recipe! So I have combined two of my favorite recipes into one this week and paired it with a glass of Merlot, the perfect dish to wow at a dinner party or savor on your own for a deliciously, decadent night in!

Rhubarb is a fruit that most people don't cook with other than in pies. And while it does make a particularly delicious addition to a fruit pie, my favorite way of preparing it has always been homemade rhubarb jam.

Every Spring I patiently await the opening of Wickhams Fruit Farm farmstand which signals the arrival of rhubarb season! You can regularly (at least once a week) find me walking across the street from the Tasting House with bags bursting with rhubarb in hand. I make rhubarb jam by the gallon in the Spring, can it and squirrel it away for the rest of the year spreading it on toast, pouring over my oatmeal, enjoying with ice cream, or just eating it by the spoonful! The tangy tartness of rhubarb paired with the sweetness of raspberries or strawberries makes for the perfect balance of tart and sweet. Pour it on top of a rich, ooey gooey, decadent baked brie and you can't lose!

 


Baked Brie with Rhubarb Jam

Cooking with Suhru: Rhubarb Jam

Ingredients:

  • 10 stalks fresh rhubarb, chopped
  • 1 pint raspberries (or strawberries)
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 TBSP cornstarch, dissolved in water
  • brie wheel
  • puff pastry sheet
  • 1/4 cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1 TBSP butter, melted
  • 1 bottle of T'Jara Merlot

Directions:

  1. Wash the rhubarb stalks and raspberries and let air dry. While the fruit is drying, cut off the top and bottom few inches of your rhubarb stalks and discard the ends. Lay the middle section of the stalk lengthwise across your cutting board and cut widthwise into small pieces.
  2. Combine chopped rhubarb, raspberries, lemon juice, sugar, and water into a saucepan and cook on medium heat for 30 minutes or until the rhubarb has broken down and all is well combined. 
  3. While the fruit is cooking, make a cornstarch slurry combining the cornstarch in 2 TBSP water.
  4. When the rhubarb mixture is finished cooking, pour the cornstarch slurry into your rhubarb mixture and stir on high heat until the fruit mixture begins to thicken.
  5. Remove from heat and let cool. Once room temperature, pour fruit jam into a jar and refrigerate until ready to use.
  6. When you are ready to make your baked brie, remove puff pastry from the fridge and let warm up on the counter for at least an hour. While the pastry is warming, chop walnuts and set aside.
  7. Cooking with Suhru: Baked Brie AssemblyPreheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  8. Roll out your puff pastry into a sheet on your cutting board and place the wheel of brie in the center. Using a sharp knife, score the top of the brie creating a lattice of cuts half way through the cheese. Sprinkle chopped walnuts on top of the scored brie, putting a few nuts aside.
  9. Fold the puff pastry over the top of the brie one corner at a time, brushing melted butter on the corners of the puff pastry to ensure the sheets stick together.
  10. Once all four corners of the puff pastry have been wrapped around the brie, flip the brie over and place it on your parchment paper lined baking sheet. Brush the exterior with the remaining melted butter and sprinkle the top with remaining chopped walnuts.
  11. Bake at 425 degrees Fahrenheit for 25 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown.
  12. Remove from the oven and let cool for 5-10 minutes. Serve topped with raspberry rhubarb jam and crackers. Pair a bottle of T'Jara Merlot (or another of your favorite Suhru Wines), relax, and enjoy!

Stop by the Tasting House to pick up a T'Jara Merlot or a bottle of your favorite wine, then run across the street to Wickhams Fruit Farm for some fresh rhubarb and get cooking!

Discover more Cooking with Suhru recipes and Food & Wine Pairings! 

Suhru Wines
 
May 4, 2021 | Suhru Wines

May Wine of the Month: 2017 Merlot

Suhru Wines May 2021 Wine of the Month: Merlot

 

With the warm weather upon us we cannot get enough of this Merlot! While the days are getting warmer we are still enjoying cooler nights and I for one have found myself repeatedly grabbing a glass of Merlot to enjoy in the backyard by the fire. Something about the rich fruit notes and soft finish makes it the perfect compliment to the warm days turned cool nights.

Our 2017 T'Jara Merlot is fruity and luscious and everything you want in a red wine this time of year! Made in the classic old-world style, the 2017 Merlot is medium to full bodied with ripe red fruit notes of raspberry and cranberry mixed with dark notes of blueberry, blackberry and plum. Lush and round with fine tannins this easy red sipper pairs beautifully with food and stands up nicely on its own! 

Keep an eye on the Blog for a few fun "Cooking with Suhru" recipes coming out soon!

Why Is Merlot So Prolific on the North Fork?

Merlot is the most widely planted variety on the East End of Long Island. This varietal flourishes in our cool climate region and ripens mid harvest, usually in the second or third week of October. Being one of the earlier ripening reds planted out here means that the fruit ripens and is harvested prior to most of the major weather events that threaten the crop, think hurricanes and early frosts.

2017 T'Jara MerlotIn a hotter region this variety loses its sweet fruit aromatics and mid palate fullness. Due to the hotter temperatures the fruit ripens more rapidly resulting in higher sugar content in the grapes which leads to higher alcohol in the wine which overwhelms the tannic structure of the varietal.

While you can grow Merlot in a variety of different regions (it is the second most widely planted grape variety on the globe), it is well established that the Bordeaux region in France is growing some of the best Merlot. If you take a closer look at the Bordeaux region, you may notice that we on Long Island are located on almost the same latitude meaning that we have a very similar climate, weather patterns, and growing conditions making us an excellent region to grow Merlot.  

A Closer Look at the Vineyard

Our 2017 Merlot is made under our T'Jara label. T'Jara is the phonetic spelling of an Aboriginal word that means "place where I am from". For all of our T'Jara wines, they are grown at a dedicated vineyard in Mattituck which is located on an elevated, south facing parcel of land. This is an important feature as south facing land means that the vines get more direct sun exposure during the day leading to better grape development. In addition, the elevated nature of this piece of land in relation to the surrounding properties allows for good wind and air flow throughout the growing season.

When it comes to vineyard management air flow is key. Particularly on the North Fork where we tend to get humid and wet days during the growing season, the ample air flow ensures that the humidity does not collect around the vines which would lead to added disease pressure and rot.

In the 2017 vintage, we saw a warm growing season with a very dry Harvest period, which is what you want in the vineyard. Grape vines are one of the few crops that like a little drought pressure. Grape vines like well drained soil so for a grape grower, a dry spell is ideal because we can turn on our irrigation and control the amount of water the vines receive. In addition to the daytime weather, in 2017 the Fall evenings in the weeks leading up to harvesting in early October saw lower than normal temperatures which allowed for 

longer 'hang time' on the vine before picking which resulted in the very expressive fruitiness of this wine. 

Want to learn more about this vintage? Checkout our 2017 Merlot

 

Shelby Hearn
 
April 28, 2021 | Shelby Hearn

Cooking with Suhru: Grilled Peconic Gold Oysters with Herb Butter & Sauvignon Blanc

Herb Butter Grilled Peconic Gold Oysters We are thrilled to have our friends Kelsey & Matt from Peconic Gold Oysters in Cutchogue as guest bloggers for this week's Cooking with Suhru! Kelsey and Matt were kind enough to share one of their favorite ways to prepare oysters and we couldn't be more obsessed. Checkout their Grilled Peconic Gold Oysters with Herb Butter recipe below!

While I love raw oysters (and consume them regularly both at home and out at local restaurants) sometimes you are looking for something a little different, some way to dress them up other than slurping a classic briny, delicious oyster topped with the homemade mignonette that is a staple in my house, enter grilled oysters!

A few years ago on a family vacation to Cape Cod my aunt introduced me to grilled oysters, a concept I had never considered before, and boy was I glad she did! I'll be honest, I was skeptical at first, not understanding why you would take a perfectly delicious raw oyster and cover it with butter, but once I tasted it I realized by cooking it with an herb butter you weren't "covering up" its briny deliciousness but opening up a new range of flavors that I hadn't previously imagined. A grilled oyster is rich and savory, decadent and delicious, and I was sold from the first bite!

Grilled oysters are a perfect way to dress-up a casual night at home in the backyard and a great way to wow and impress company when you whip out your shucking knife, grill pan and get to work! No matter the occasion, oysters make any meal better in my opinion. Pair it with a glass of crisp, dry white wine and you can't go wrong!


Grilled Peconic Gold Oysters with Herb Butter

As the temperatures start to rise on the North Fork and the days get longer and brighter, we always crave grilled Peconic Gold Oysters on the half shell with herb butter as a quick segway to dinner after a long day on the farm. It is so easy to make this recipe and SO satisfying!  The best part is that you can experiment with this recipe and use any ingredients you have on hand or leftover from earlier in the week.  We love recipes where we can use what we have in the fridge instead of running to the store after a long day.

Peconic Gold OystersThis is a quick and easy recipe that will only take a few minutes to cook and prepare, however there are a few tools that you will need. Be sure you have an Oyster Shucking Knife (available at the Peconic Gold Oyster Stand) and an Oyster Cast Iron Pan. If you don't yet have an Oyster Pan, you can use a baking sheet with crumpled tin foil to make "nests" for oysters on the half shell.

Ingredients:

  • 12 Peconic Gold Oysters, freshly shucked
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • handful of parsley (or cilantro), stems removed & chopped
  • zest of 1 lemon (or lime)
  • juice of 1 lemon (or lime)
  • 1 bottle of Suhru Sauvignon Blanc

Herb Butter Grilled Peconic Gold OystersDirections:

  1. Preheat your grill or oven to 400°
  2. While your grill or oven is heating up, shuck 12 Peconic Gold Oysters—visit the Peconic Gold Oyster Blog to learn how to shuck by a pro
  3. Once shucked, place the oysters on the half shell with the open side up in your oyster pan or tin foil nests.
  4. Combine the garlic, shallot, herbs, and lemon (or lime) zest and juice in a bowl along with the melted butter and mix until well combined. 
  5. Spoon one tablespoon (or so) of the herb butter mixture on each oyster
  6. Place pan on your grill or in the oven and bake at 400° for 10 - 15 minutes or until the herb butter mixture is bubbly.
  7. Remove from the oven and let stand for a few moments until warm.
  8. Pair a bottle of Suhru Sauvignon Blanc (or another of your favorite Suhru Wines), relax, and enjoy!

Stop by the Peconic Gold Oyster Stand at 21125 County Road 48 in Cutchogue to pick up oysters in the shell, shucking knives, and more! The Peconic Gold self-serve stand is open daily and is always stocked with our freshest and finest oysters. For more information, call us at 631.495.7061 or visit peconicgoldoysters.com 

Discover more Cooking with Suhru recipes and Food & Wine Pairings! 
Suhru Wines
 
April 21, 2021 | Suhru Wines

How Rosé Wine is Made

Ever wonder how rosé is made? If you are familiar with the winemaking process you likely know that when a grape reaches optimal ripeness (desired amount of sugar aka brix balancing the desired amount of acidity) the fruit is harvested and brought to the winery to begin its fermentation process.

Winemaking is both a science and an art so every winemaker will do things slightly different, however here at Suhru we are taking the Provence winemaking approach to our rosé focusing on light, fresh, fruit flavors and a light salmon hue.

To achieve this style, we purposely harvest our fruit a full 2-3 weeks earlier than we would for our red wines to ensure higher acidity in the grape. Once the fruit arrives at the winery, it is destemmed and crushed. During the crushing process the berries are split open allowing the juice to run free and be in contact with the exterior of the grape skins which is essential for color extraction. This crushed fruit is left to soak for ⁣6 hours of skin contact which allows it to extract a nice fruitiness and light salmon hue without the body, weight, or tannin, that an extended extraction (what we typically do for red wines) would result in. 

Once the 6 hour soak is complete, the fruit is loaded into the press where we gently extract the liquid juice from the grape skins and seeds before the juice is pumped into tank. At this point the juice is inoculated with yeast and begins its fermentation process.

During fermentation the yeast cells that we have introduced through inoculation begin to consume the naturally occurring sugars in the grape juice. As the yeast consumes the sugar it produces alcohol and releases carbon dioxide (CO2). Once all of the sugars have been consumed and converted into alcohol the yeast cells die and settle to the bottom of the tank. Once everything settles the clear wine is racked (aka transferred) off the solids into a new tank where it undergoes the final finishing touches (heat stabilization, cold stabilization, filtering, etc) before it is bottled, chilled and served! 


Suhru RoséLearn More About Our Rosé

A soft summer sipper with a flinty minerality, our 2019 Dry Rosé—a blend of Cabernet Franc and Merlot—has notes of white peach, pink grapefruit, and ever so slight hints of cherry berry giving way to a soft acidity and zingy finish. This refreshing wine will leave you dreaming of long weekend, warm weather, and time spent by the water! 

The light flavors and crisp finish make this a versatile wine able to stand up nicely with a wide range of lighter fare including seafood, salads, chicken, chilled pasta, lobster, and pork. This wine is perfect for the beach, sitting by the pool, and a summer BBQ!⁣

We are excited to be offering our Rosé in both a 750ml bottle and 375ml can to make it easy to take your favorite wine with you wherever you may go—on the boat, on a hike, to the beach, gardening, or simple lazing by the pool! 

Shop Rosé Wines in Bottle & Cans!
Time Posted: Apr 21, 2021 at 5:00 AM
Suhru Wines
 
April 15, 2021 | Suhru Wines

New Release: 2020 Pinot Grigio

New Release: 2020 Suhru Pinot GrigioWe are thrilled to announce the release of our 2020 Pinot Grigio, which recently won Gold at the 2021 New York Wine Classic! Our signature white wine from the very beginning, we are proud to say that this particular vintage is one of our best. While 2020 was a rough year for a number of regions, it was a good year to grow white wines on the North Fork!

A Closer Look: Behind the Bottle

After the grapes are harvested, arrive at the winery, are de-stemmed and crushed, they undergo fermentation. Once the yeast have consumed all of the naturally occurring sugars in the grape juice turning it into alcohol the yeast cells die and precipitate out of the solution, settling to the bottom of the tank. The solids at the bottom of the tank are known as the lees and are most often referred to when making sparkling wine. 

For the last two years we have been using a newer winemaking technique in our white wines. Once the wines finish fermentation they are racked off the fermentation lees and these lees are put aside. The fermented wine is then filtered, heat stabilized, cold stabilized, filtered again and then the fermentation lees are reintroduced to the finished wine. The wine ages sur lie (aka on the lees) post-fermentation for 4 months. This aging process adds an extra layer of richness and complexity to the wine which is evident in the long, rich finish on the wine. 

Suhru Pinot Grigio & LobsterWhat Made 2020 Special?

2020 was an excellent year for white wines. We had slightly cooler than normal nights as well as cooler days during the harvest period which retained acidity and fruit intensity in the grapes. Because of these cooler conditions the fruit ripened a little slower but held its acidity meaning that we harvested a little later than normal leading to extended fruit development. All of these factors led to wine in the bottle which is bright and crisp with robust and nicely developed fruit flavors.

Food & Wine Pairing Suggestions

Pinot Grigio is one of those white wine varieties that pairs with a huge range of foods including cheese, seafood, chicken, pasta, and more. While there are a plethora of great options to choose from when pairing this wine, one of our all time favorite pairings is Pinot Grigio and Lobster! Nothing says "Hello Spring" like a fresh lobster and a cold glass of Pinot Grigio! No matter what you choose, here's to good food, good wine, and good company! 

Learn More About our New Release—2020 Pinot Grigio

 

 

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